Environmental efforts earn accolades

by Lisa Timmerman 9/10/2014 11:17 AM

 

A few months ago, this blog featured two research papers describing the latest and greatest in environmental achievements at airports and seaports. One of those documents, Environmental Initiatives at Seaports Worldwide: A Snapshot of Best Practices, just earned an Environmental Improvement Award from the American Association of Port Authorities.

AAPA issued the award in the Stakeholder Awareness, Education and Involvement category. The Port of Portland worked with the International Institute for Sustainable Seaports to develop, and later update, a white paper that highlights major environmental initiatives at seaports across the globe. Though the paper was originally conceived to gather information to support decisions about future marine terminal development in Portland, the paper was designed so that the information could also assist other ports around the globe as they reached the same critical decision points. The Port will receive the award in November at AAPA's annual conference.

The Port also recently earned a Special Recognition from the Oregon Association of Clean Water Agencies for serving as a role model in using alternative stormwater management techniques. In 2006, the Port installed over 35 acres of porous pavement at Terminal 6. The success of that installation set the stage for Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway Company to install nine acres of porous pavement on a parcel it recently purchased from the Port. The site is the first facility where BNSF has installed pervious pavement. The installation provides water quality benefits and eliminates the need for detention ponds, allowing BNSF to make the best use of its available space.

Still porous after all these years

by Lisa Timmerman 8/13/2014 4:43 PM

 

The Portland metropolitan region leads the nation in innovative solutions for managing stormwater. It's common to see bioswales installed in curb strips across the city and traditional impervious pavement is more often being replaced with alternatives that allow stormwater to filter through the surface. So, it's not surprising that last week the city of Portland hosted StormCon, an annual conference that draws stormwater management professionals from across the country to learn and share best practices and the latest developments in the field. The conference culminated with a tour of stormwater facilities at the Port of Portland and the Port of Vancouver.  

In 2006, the Port of Portland installed just over 35 acres of porous pavement at Terminal 6 in North Portland when tenant, Auto Warehousing Company wanted to rapidly expand their existing vehicle import and storage operation. Their short timeframe set the stage for a creative solution involving a large-scale installation capable of infiltrating 100 percent of the stormwater from the new development on-site. Porous pavement allows stormwater to filter through the ground instead of conveying it through a system of drains, pipes and outfalls, improving water quality and allowing water to flow more slowly and naturally to a receiving waterbody. It is still a relatively new practice, compared to the traditional impervious paving common to the many ribbons of roadways and acres of parking lots across the country.

The StormCon tour, sponsored by Kennedy/Jenks Consultants, consisted of about 80 participants who visited Terminal 6 to witness first-hand that a well-constructed pervious pavement installation can function successfully in an industrial environment when matched with an appropriate site use. Due to its structure, porous pavement is not often used in industrial operations since it cannot as readily handle the impacts of heavy cargo and machinery. AWC's auto storage lot was a great fit due to the primarily light passenger vehicles that move across its surface. The lot is visited by heavier trucks that load and haul the cars away to their destinations, and those loading areas were designed with stronger impervious pavement that drains to the pervious surfaces or to adjacent vegetated swales.  

To function properly over time, a porous pavement installation must be thoughtfully constructed and maintained. I’ve been observing how the facility pavement functions for almost a decade now and it performs as well today as it did when I first visited the site in 2007," said tour sponsor and stormwater practice leader for Kennedy/Jenks Consultants, Ross Dunning. "The T-6 installation is a shining example of low impact development done right and the most successful permeable pavement installation I’ve ever seen.”

Tour participants were treated to a demonstration of the installation's effectiveness by Richard Vincent, senior environmental planner for the Port of Portland, which can be viewed in the video below.

 

Related Links

Terminal 6 porous pavement project featured in Land & Water Magazine

The Green Side: Terminal 6 Paves the Way to Infiltration