Supreme Committee visits Port HQ

by Lisa Timmerman 3/1/2013 9:57 AM

The Port of Portland received a visit last week from the Qatar 2022 Supreme Committee during their U.S. trade mission to the West Coast. The committee is responsible for planning infrastructure improvements for the 2022 FIFA World Cup. Qatar is one of the fastest growing economies in the world and plans to renovate three stadiums and build nine new stadiums, open a new international airport, expand its container port facility and expand its light rail and highway systems ahead of the event.

The delegation was led by U.S. Ambassador to Qatar, Susan L. Ziadeh and Qatar Secretary General, Hassan Al-Thawadi. The group also visited Los Angeles and Seattle. Other stops during their stay in Portland included Nike and Jeld-Wen Field.

While at Port headquarters, the group toured our LEED Platinum building to learn more about its energy and water saving features, like our Living Machine®. Executive Director Bill Wyatt described Port operations in general and discussed the Port's sustainability efforts including parking guidance and QuickPay parking payment system that help reduce emissions from idling vehicles. The group, which had many questions even at the end of a long day touring Portland, was particularly interested in what drives the culture around sustainability in Portland. 

 

The Qatar 2022 Supreme Committee (some sporting their Portland Timbers scarves) with Port Executive Director Bill Wyatt and Jennifer Woods, U.S. Department of Commerce

Related Links

PDX leads the pack in bike access

by Lisa Timmerman 1/31/2013 2:36 PM

We are quite proud of our bike facilities here at Portland International Airport, but who doesn't like a little validation? PDX was featured in a study completed through the University of California Transportation Center and the Safe Transportation Research & Education Center at the University of California, Berkeley that looked at obstacles and opportunities for airport operators to improve bike access. The report included case studies of seven airports, and recognized PDX as "exemplary" due to its bike and pedestrian master planning efforts, convenient access, facilities that support bike commuting and connections with transit, bike routes and multi-modal trails.

California bike blog, Cyclist Chic, offers a great overview of the study. See the Safe Transportation Research & Education Center's website for the full study and a poster with highlights from the study. The Port of Portland first developed a Bike and Pedestrian Master Plan in 2003 and an update to the plan will be completed this year.

 

Port headquarters building goes for gold

by Lisa Timmerman 1/22/2013 9:26 AM

The Port of Portland LEED Platinum headquarters building has another metal to add to its list of honors - gold. The Port's headquarters building recently received a gold certification through the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability’s Sustainability at Work program. The gold certification is the highest level that can be achieved through the program which recognizes local businesses and organizations for their leadership in helping make Portland one of the cleanest, most sustainable cities in the country. The certification criteria include numerous actions related to energy efficiency, water conservation, waste management, transportation, procurement and employee education. The actions were verified during an onsite visit with a Sustainability at Work advisor.  

“The Port’s achievements are impressive both in the design and construction of an incredibly energy and water efficient headquarters building and ongoing waste minimization efforts that have diverted 84 percent of the building’s waste stream from the landfill,” said Sustainability at Work advisor, Paul deBlock.

The Port received the BEST Award for projects in 2004, 2006 and 2011, under a similar City program and the headquarters building has received numerous honors including the Oregon Sustainability Award. However, this certification recognizes both the thoughtful considerations the Port incorporated into the building itself and the ongoing, day-to-day operations within the building.  

NextGen helps PDX flights lower emissions, minimize noise

by Lisa Timmerman 12/26/2012 3:54 PM

If you flew into PDX this holiday season, it's possible you may have been on a flight starting to use new technology in their final approach to the runway. The Federal Aviation Administration published flight approach procedures for its Next Generation Air Transportation System, also known as NextGen, in September. The satellite-based aircraft navigation system is gradually replacing the nation's legacy ground-based equipment network and is designed to help pilots fly existing routes more precisely. 

The new system brings multiple benefits. NextGen technology gives pilots the ability to fly an optimized profile descent, also known as a continuous descent approach. The approach enables the aircraft to maintain a continuous descent from the point of initial descent to the runway using a lower power setting and higher altitude for less noise and less fuel, thus reducing air emissions.

“From helping us minimize aircraft noise, to reducing aircraft carbon emissions, NextGen has numerous benefits for PDX and our community,” said Jason Schwartz, Port of Portland noise management manager. “We have many to thank for helping bring NextGen to PDX, including the FAA, the PDX Citizen Noise Advisory Committee, Alaska Air Group, Southwest Airlines and SkyWest Airlines.”

Procedures at PDX for using satellite-based technology for departures have been in place since 2008 and have proven successful in helping aircraft follow noise abatement routes. Most commercial aircraft using PDX are equipped with the advance avionics in the cockpit needed for NextGen navigation. Early estimates show that 10-20 percent of flights will use new NextGen arrivals procedures initially, and others will phase in over time. Next spring, the FAA plans to release arrival procedures, which will guide aircraft that are further out from the airport. 

For more information about how innovation and technology are yielding environmental and community benefits in the aviation industry, check out FAA Administrator J. Randolph Babbitt's discussion on the topic.

Best wishes to our departing interns from Inha University

by Lisa Timmerman 12/12/2012 4:56 PM

This week, the Port of Portland bid a fond farewell to our interns from Inha University in South Korea. The three students recently completed their five-month internships at the Port. Before departing, they each gave a final presentation about what they learned while working at the Port and reflected on being immersed in a different culture.

The trio is studying logistics and rotated through many different departments at the Port during their term. A few of their noteworthy accomplishments include conducting cargo market research, identifying new efficiencies for moving passengers through the ticket lobby at Portland International Airport and learning more about how other airports handle wireless internet and parking fees. One of the interns also shared his knowledge of South Korea’s “pay as you throw” waste collection system that uses RFID technology.

You may have seen their smiling faces if you attended the Hillsboro Airport Open House, a Hillsboro Airport Roundtable Exchange meeting or Seaport Celebration this year. They also got to make their American television debut by appearing on the KATU live television show AM Northwest to promote Seaport Celebration.  

The Port has hosted interns from Inha University every year since 2009. In addition to providing them with a well-rounded educational experience, Port staff benefits from the daily cultural exchange with individuals from one of Oregon’s major trade partners. We wish them luck in their upcoming travels, completion of their studies and future careers.

Read intern Ellyn Lee's previous guest post on this blog for an additional story about her early impressions after arriving in Oregon and working at the Port. 

Inha University students (from left) Kyle Koh, Daniel Kim and Ellyn Lee

With great community partners come great opportunities

by Lisa Timmerman 11/9/2012 1:08 PM

 

Our community partners are doing some wonderful work and there are a couple of ways you can get involved. We may be nearing the peak rainy season, but there are still plenty of reasons to get outdoors and make a difference in your neighborhood. Friends of Baltimore Woods has already hosted a number of successful volunteer events and continues to team up with SOLVE to hold volunteer work parties in St. Johns to remove invasive species and plant native trees and shrubs. Baltimore Woods is a remnant of a native white oak forest and the all-volunteer group Friends of Baltimore Woods is seeking to create a linear park that connects Cathedral Park with Pier Park and would provide access for recreation and education purposes. The next two work parties will take place on this Saturday, November 10 and Saturday, December 1. Use SOLVE's online volunteer registration page to sign up.  

Also this month, the Oregon Environmental Council kicked off their most recent Love Your River challenge, focusing on how you can help prevent pollution in storm drains. The challenge encourages the public to engage in at least one of three actions including clearing your street's storm drain, refraining from dumping into storm drains and volunteering to assist in labeling storm drains. If you're willing to take on the challenge, you could be the lucky recipient of a Patagonia backpack or this year's grand prize: a four-person tent, two sleeping pads, and two camp chairs from REI. 

Inha University intern reflects on experiences at the Port

by Lisa Timmerman 10/15/2012 5:04 PM

Each year, since 2009, the Port of Portland has hosted student interns from South Korea’s Inha University. Many of the student interns are interested in working for ports, airlines or in logistics. The student interns stay for five months and rotate through different departments at the Port. Intern Ellyn Lee recently spent a couple of weeks in our Community Affairs department and I asked her to share her impressions so far of living in Portland and working for the Port. Here’s what she had to say, in her own words:

It’s been more than two months since I arrived at this comparatively small city, after traveling more than 24 hours from my home in Korea. The journey made me realize the very big difference between the two countries, which was even larger than I expected. Portland is a perfect city to live in. It’s all green, the weather is gorgeous in the summer, there are hundreds of things to do such as hiking, camping, and fishing around this city, lots of local festivals are going on, and no sales tax! At first, it was surprising to me that some people have their own boat as I could never imagine anyone who tows a boat on a highway in Korea. But after I went to some ‘green places’ like Lost Lake by Mt. Hood, I realized it was not weird at all for people living in Oregon to have a boat or that kind of outdoor activity equipment.

The food is totally different from Korea. I remember on my first day of work when we had lunch with all our supervisors, I had no idea what to eat at the restaurant. I hadn’t had or even heard of such kinds of food back in Korea. I had to look at the menu carefully for a while so that I didn’t choose a food I might not want. It is interesting to me that Americans love Asian food like Japanese, Thai and Chinese. I generally like the foods here, but I will never get used to cilantro. This is not just my personal preference, but most other Koreans cannot eat or even smell it. I know that foreigners including Americans cannot eat some Korean food because of its strong scent, so I think it is a fair trade-off.

Working at the Port of Portland is such a big opportunity for me as a student studying logistics. I have rotated around to different departments and learned how each is operated.  I want to work for the airlines or an airport in a few years and every part of this experience is helpful to see how cargo and passengers go back and forth. I’m also getting some ideas about which department of the airport or airlines I would like to work in the future. I have had lots of tours of the airfield, concourses, marine terminals, and other Port properties during first several weeks. Other students in Korea might never have the chance to step on the airfield or climb on a crane. I also helped out at some events like Seaport Celebration and the Asiana Cargo First Year Celebration. These experiences have taught me how the Port works with the public and its customers. I’m having a wonderful time experiencing many new things that I can’t do back in Korea. I love this city, the people, and the Port of Portland. This five months will be a memory I will never forget.

RiverFest celebrates its third year

by Lisa Timmerman 8/30/2012 1:16 PM

If you want an excuse to get down to the water in mid-September, RiverFest may be the event for you. The annual festival is now in its fifth year and will take place from Sept. 21-23. It features an assortment of river-related activities in Portland, up and down the Willamette River.

 

For the athletically-inclined, Cathedral Park will serve as the backdrop for the Portland Triathlon, recognized as the Greenest Triathlon in the U.S. by Triathlete Magazine in 2010. The event will be held concurrently with the family-friendly River Fair, also taking place at Cathedral Park. For those that prefer a more leisurely place, Alder Creek Kayak and Portland Kayaking Company will be offering kayak tours closer to downtown. While you are there, be sure to check out SOLVE’s RiverFest Cleanup, OMSI’s OMNIMAX Theater showings and Industry & Art - all taking place in conjunction with RiverFest.

 

View the event schedule at www.portlandriverfest.org for more information about the events, times and costs.

 

Seaport Celebration: a Zero Waste event

by Lisa Timmerman 8/24/2012 2:22 PM

Last weekend, Terminal 4 was host to another successful Seaport Celebration. The annual event is a festive day of family-oriented activities put on by the Port of Portland and many of our community partners and terminal operators. Though the weather was unseasonably mild, people of all ages turned out to enjoy interactive displays, games, jet boat tours and a cruise on the Portland Spirit. This year’s event was a first-rate success in another regard.

We have been steadily improving upon waste minimization efforts at our headquarters building, with a goal of achieving Zero Waste status. This is no small feat when you consider that our main office is home to about 450 employees on any given work day. We also strive to minimize waste whenever possible at Port-sponsored events and this year we are proud to report that Seaport Celebration was a Zero Waste event.

After tallying the numbers, the event achieved an impressive 97 percent waste diversion rate. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency threshold for Zero Waste status is a 90 percent or greater diversion rate. Much of this success is due to dedicated Port staff and the efforts of the Port of Portland Technical Assistance Project. PTAP staff is part of Portland State University’s Community Environmental Services program and work in partnership with Port staff to reduce landfill-bound waste by implementing recycling, composting and other waste prevention programs.

Related Links

Zero Waste Alliance

PSU - Community Environmental Services - Port of Portland Technical Assistance Project

Port tour will show Toyota's green side

by Lisa Timmerman 7/11/2012 2:51 PM

The final tour in this year's Portland Harbor: Behind the Scenes series will highlight Toyota Logistics Services located at the Port of Portland's Terminal 4. Get an up-close look at the first industrial site in the nation to earn a Salmon-Safe certification and one of the first industrial facilities to earn Leadership in Energy Efficiency and Design (LEED) Gold certification. TLS imports tens of thousands of vehicles each year through their docks. With approximately 200 local employees and a regional economic impact of $271 per vehicle, not only is TLS an economic driver for Portland, their commitment to the environment is exceptional. Learn how your new Lexus, Scion or Toyota could come through Portland and how their facility-wide commitment to the environment results in a 98.1 percent recycling rate.

The tour will take place Wednesday, July 18 from noon–3 p.m. Tours are 1.5 hours long and will be scheduled in stages within that timeframe. Participants must be at least 15 years of age and minors are required to be accompanied by an adult. Please RSVP to Brooke Berglund by email or by phone at 503.415.6532.

Related Link:

Portland Harbor: Behind the Scenes Tour and Lecture Series

Portland's Working Waterfront