Digging in at Baltimore Woods

by Lisa Timmerman 11/8/2013 2:56 PM

Port of Portland staff and their friends and families spent a sunny morning in October volunteering alongside SOLVE, Friends of Baltimore Woods and St. Johns residents.  The group of 50 volunteers planted 500 native tree and plant species at the gateway to the Baltimore Woods Connectivity Corridor. The corridor is located in North Portland and stretches between Pier Park and Cathedral Park, in the shadow of the St. Johns Bridge. Friends of Baltimore Woods has been working tirelessly with the help of local government agencies, nonprofits, and a small army of volunteers to restore the rare remnant patch of oak forest and to create a future greenway. In addition to the ecological and recreational benefits the site provides, it also serves as a buffer between industrial land uses along the Willamette River, including the Port’s marine Terminal 4, and nearby St. Johns residential neighborhoods.

We look forward to watching the little saplings as they grow!

 

PDX Tree Obstruction Removal Project begins

by Lisa Timmerman 9/26/2013 9:50 AM

This week, the Port began work on the first phase of a project to remove cottonwood trees growing beneath federally-regulated airspace at Portland International Airport. The site will ultimately be replanted with lower-growing, native plants. Although this first phase of tree removal took only a few days, the project is the culmination of years of planning.

Portland has a well-deserved reputation as a tree-loving city, from the iconic Forest Park to the steadfast efforts of local nonprofit, Friends of Trees. Cutting down trees is not something we take lightly. The Port was faced with a decision that was absolutely necessary to keep PDX operational well into the future.

The stand of cottonwood trees in question is located in a vegetated area within the economy parking lots. The trees lie below the regulated airspace for approaches and departures from PDX’s north runway. The trees were not yet to the point where they posed a flight safety risk, but they were beginning to penetrate other types of Federal Aviation Administration regulated airspace surrounding the flight paths. These areas are protected to prevent interference with instruments that guide approaching planes and to provide safe paths for planes should they experience mechanical difficulties.

The issue of trees encroaching on the airspace near the north runway has long been identified as a conflict that would eventually need to be addressed. In 2000, the trees were topped, providing an estimated 10-year window of protection for the airspace. Unfortunately, this was not a long-term solution. Topping trees compromises their health, making them hazardous to work around. Therefore, additional topping was not a viable option.

When master planning for PDX began through the Airport Futures process in 2007, removing the cottonwood trees in the economy lot was identified as an essential project to keep the airport operational well into the future. The Airport Futures process allowed the Port to work with the City of Portland and other stakeholders to develop a replanting plan that reflects the site’s status as an environmental zone and provides a sustainable, long-term solution that protects flight safety at PDX. When the site is replanted next fall, the trees will be replaced with more than 23,000 native shrub and small tree species such as vine maple, Oregon grape, red-flowering currant and native roses and willow. They will be planted around existing, lower-growing species of trees and shrubs that were left untouched.

While the loss of these trees is unfortunate, we have been able to complete the project in a way that was both as minimally invasive as possible and allows reuse of some of the logs and stumps for mitigation projects. The logging contractor hired by the Port used state-of-the-art equipment and technology to remove the trees, reducing the impact on the site and the amount of time during which the logging activity took place. Some of the logs cut for the project are being reserved to create turtle basking features at Port mitigation sites and some stumps will serve as large woody debris to create nearshore habitat.

The project is planned in phases to minimize site disturbance during wet weather months and to maximize the survivability of the new plants. It will take a little over a year for the site to be replanted and longer for it to become well-established. We will keep you posted on the site’s progress over time. 

 Artist's renderings of the site replanted with low-growing, native vegetation.

 

 

Ecoroof buzzes with activity

by Lisa Timmerman 8/9/2013 5:05 PM

About a year and a half ago, bees showed up in force on the roof of the Port of Portland's LEED Platinum headquarters building thanks to project development manager and apiary enthusiast, Greg Sparks. The Port's Annie Linstrom heralded their arrival in a post on this blog in February 2012. This week, Public Affairs intern, Jayson Shanafelt provides an update on how the bees are doing.

The Port's LEED Platinum headquarters building is renowned for its sustainable features. Visitors from across the globe have toured the building to see and learn about its living machine and other environmental attributes. What visitors may not realize is that one year ago, the Port installed a second living machine—a beehive on the 10th floor eco roof, now home to roughly 70,000 honey bees.

Visible from inside the building, the hive serves as an educational opportunity, allowing employees and HQ visitors to observe an active bee colony up close. The intent of establishing this safe haven for the bees was, in part, to increase awareness of the critical role they play in our everyday lives. Nearly one-third of the U.S. diet is incumbent on honey bee pollination, yet their populations are on the decline.

"It is always a point of interest for tour groups. I feel they come away with a better appreciation and understanding of how important honey bees are to our food production," said Greg Sparks, project development manager and the Port's resident beekeeper. "The main question people want to know is 'How are they doing?'"

Sparks confesses that when the hive was installed, he wasn't sure if the height of the building would be detrimental to foraging worker bees, which at times can travel up to two miles for food. "It has been a happy discovery. The height doesn't seem to have deterred them. They are doing quite well, which is a good thing to see."

The beehive structure is taller than it used to be. Sparks decided to add an additional box to the hive after recently observing the colony's health. "They need to have the room," Sparks said, noting that the bees easily have produced 100 pounds of honey."

Interest generated from the hive has even inspired several Port staff to start their own apiaries (honey bee colonies). "I sense that many Port staff take pride in having this unique feature at our already impressive building," said Sparks.

 

Alderwood Path repair complete

by Lisa Timmerman 7/18/2013 1:09 PM

 

Alderwood Path completed repair work - July 2013

The Alderwood Path, a multi-use trail that runs through Portland International Center, is now reopoened. The Port of Portland just completed follow-up repair work on the trail. The trail had become severely damaged by tree root upheaval in several locations. In February, the Port removed some trees that were posing a present and future upheaval risk to the path. The repair work consisted of repaving the path and installing root barriers in some locations to prevent future damage. Tha path consists of two segments - one runs along a natural area, while the other parallels the Columbia Slough. The improved path is ready just in time for cyclists and walkers alike to enjoy the beautiful weather.

  

 Alderwood Path prior to repair work - January 2013 

Port and Portland State University celebrate 10 years of success and innovation

by Lisa Timmerman 6/12/2013 4:19 PM

It takes a special kind of person to be willing to dig through the garbage on a regular basis. Thanks to a partnership with Portland State University, this week marks the tenth year that those special people have been making a difference at Portland International Airport. Through PSU’s Community Environmental Services program, student consultants work for the Port of Portland in one- or two-year terms and work alongside Port staff to gain experience solving real-life waste management problems. Although they serve all Port facilities, they focus on the Port’s primary waste generator - PDX. The airport is like a small city with 10,000 employees and 35,000 people passing through every day. It's a unique setting for developing innovative and creative waste solutions on a large-scale.

Through the students' long-standing support, the Port has made incredible strides in reducing waste. They have played a large role in designing and implementing PDX’s waste collection systems and composting program. They have been involved in researching recycling options for coffee cups, conducting waste assessments for airlines and airport terminal tenants and holding annual clean up events for tenants to find ways to recycle and repurpose large and bulky items. Most recently, the students helped launch a highly successful food donation program through St. Vincent dePaul of Portland and helped redesign liquid collection stations at security checkpoints, dramatically increasing their use by travelers.

The partnership truly provides benefits for both the Port and PSU students. “I attribute the longevity and success of this program to two things: the Port’s impressive commitment to keep pushing the needle forward on these issues, and the great students that CES continues to attract. I can’t think of a better embodiment of PSU’s motto, 'Let Knowledge Serve the City,'" says Eric T. Crum, director of the CES program.

Although the program has been in place for many years, there is no typical day for a CES student working at the Port. They do everything from collecting and managing data, to running outreach and education campaigns, to rolling their sleeves up and conducting waste sorts that determine where there are opportunities for program improvements. Their versatility is invaluable and we look forward to another ten years of success and collaboration.

For more information on the partnership between PSU and the Port and a full list of the students’ accomplishments, visit: www.pdx.edu

For additional news on the partnership's anniversary, visit:
PDX.edu
Oregon Live

Celebrate World Environment Day with the PDX Sustainability Tour

by Lisa Timmerman 5/13/2013 12:49 PM

World Environment Day is Wednesday, June 5 and Portland has been selected as the 2013 North American host city. To celebrate this great honor bestowed by the United Nations, there are many great events happening all over Portland leading up to the big day.

The Port will host a walking tour of Portland International Airport and portions of our LEED Platinum headquarters building on World Environment Day. Join us and learn about the many sustainability solutions in place at PDX. Whether it's reducing waste or our carbon footprint, providing alternate transportation options or using natural systems to treat wastewater onsite, there's a lot to be proud of at Portland's gateway to the world. The PDX Sustainability Tour will take place June 5 from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. To RSVP or for more information, email lisa.timmerman@portofportland.com.

Powerful praise from EPA

by Lisa Timmerman 4/18/2013 2:13 PM

 

The Port of Portland has been ranked tenth in the nation in the Local Governments category under the EPA's Green Power Partnership program. The Port began purchasing renewable energy credits (RECs) in 2009 and now purchases 100 percent renewable energy through RECs. The Port also ranked 21st in the nation for power purchases amongst other organizations that purchase 100 percent renewable energy. This last year, that equated to over 75 million kilowatt hours of energy from renewable sources.

In addition to purchasing RECs for organization-wide operations, Portland International Airport also features on-site power generation from two solar panel arrays and cogeneration from methane produced at its deicing stormwater treatment facility. The Port's headquarters building and the long-term parking garage it sits atop use a variety of energy efficiency measures that respectively use 36 percent and 75 percent less energy than their similarly sized counterparts.

According to the Sustainable Business Oregon article about the rankings, the Port shared honors with other leading Oregon-based organizations including Intel, City of Portland, Lewis & Clark College, Oregon State University and Southern Oregon University.

Less Waste, More Food

by Lisa Timmerman 4/4/2013 1:10 PM

According to a Natural Resources Defense Council report released last year, 40 percent of food in the United States goes uneaten. The statistic is particularly alarming considering the amount of people that go hungry every day. Port of Portland staff recognized an opportunity in our own backyard and recently launched a food donation program, facilitating partnership between St. Vincent de Paul and concessionaires at Portland International Airport. The program encourages food and beverage vendors in the airport terminal to divert unsold, ready-to-eat food products to the local charitable organization. Products include sandwiches, salads, parfaits, baked goods and uncut produce.

The program launched in February and PDX concessionaires donated so much food that by the end of the first pickup day on February 5th, the Port and St. Vincent's staff needed to round up a second donation storage refrigerator. In the first two months of collection, donations weighed in at 2,760 pounds of food - equivalent to more than 1,830 meals. The food ends up with social service providers City Team Ministries, Northwest Family Services and St. Vincent's mobile full-service kitchen.

"This is a win-win for local communities in need and for the airport, too," said Walt Marchbanks, Port concessions operations manager.

Not only is the program matching high quality food with agencies that can distribute it, it's removing food items that serve a higher and better purpose from the waste stream at PDX. In 2012, PDX collected a record 201 tons of food waste for composting. By continuing to donate at least 50 to 100 pounds of high quality food to St. Vincent’s three times a week, the program could divert 5 to 10 percent of what would have ultimately ended up in the compost stream.

 

Support your local tree with two great volunteer events

by Lisa Timmerman 3/7/2013 2:32 PM

Once again, we have a few great volunteer events coming up in March through our community partners. Want an excuse to get out and get your hands dirty and support Portland's urban tree canopy?

  

Saturday, March 9, The Forest Park Conservancy will hold its Spring Day of Stewardship from 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. The Forest Park Conservancy is a dedicated non-profit charged with protecting and fostering the ecological health of Forest Park, maintaining and enhancing the park's extensive trail network, and inspiring community appreciation and future stewardship of the park. The Port is sponsorsing the event this year. Join 200 other volunteers in Forest Park helping to restore native habitat in and around the park. The volunteer work party will be followed by a volunteer appreciation party at the Mission Theater with food, drinks and raffle prizes. The event is open to anyone, but pre-registration is required.

 

Saturday, March 30, Friends of Trees will hold a neighborhood tree planting in the Beaumont-Wilshire, Cully and Roseway neighborhoods. The Port provides Friends of Trees with funding support annually for tree canopy enhancements in neighborhoods around PDX and within the Columbia Slough watershed. This is a large-scale planting, so the more, the merrier. Volunteers should arrive at the Morningstar Missionary Church by 8:45 a.m. to enjoy some hot coffee and breakfast treats. The planting starts promptly at 9 a.m. FOT will provide gloves and tools, so all you need to do is show up dressed for the weather and wearing sturdy shoes. A potluck lunch will also be provided for all volunteers after the planting is complete. You do not need to RSVP for the event.

 

 

Port staff and their families participate in a Friends of Trees tree planting

Supreme Committee visits Port HQ

by Lisa Timmerman 3/1/2013 9:57 AM

The Port of Portland received a visit last week from the Qatar 2022 Supreme Committee during their U.S. trade mission to the West Coast. The committee is responsible for planning infrastructure improvements for the 2022 FIFA World Cup. Qatar is one of the fastest growing economies in the world and plans to renovate three stadiums and build nine new stadiums, open a new international airport, expand its container port facility and expand its light rail and highway systems ahead of the event.

The delegation was led by U.S. Ambassador to Qatar, Susan L. Ziadeh and Qatar Secretary General, Hassan Al-Thawadi. The group also visited Los Angeles and Seattle. Other stops during their stay in Portland included Nike and Jeld-Wen Field.

While at Port headquarters, the group toured our LEED Platinum building to learn more about its energy and water saving features, like our Living Machine®. Executive Director Bill Wyatt described Port operations in general and discussed the Port's sustainability efforts including parking guidance and QuickPay parking payment system that help reduce emissions from idling vehicles. The group, which had many questions even at the end of a long day touring Portland, was particularly interested in what drives the culture around sustainability in Portland. 

 

The Qatar 2022 Supreme Committee (some sporting their Portland Timbers scarves) with Port Executive Director Bill Wyatt and Jennifer Woods, U.S. Department of Commerce

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